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use-state-machine

3.0.5 • Public • Published

npm bundle size Build Status JavaScript Style Guide

use-state-machine

Use Finite State Machines with React Hooks

Installation

$ npm install --save use-state-machine

Example

// H2O.js
import React from 'react'
import { useStateMachine } from 'use-state-machine'
import H2OState from './H2O.state'
 
function H2O () {
  const [current, transition] = useStateMachine(H2OState)
  return (
    <div>
      <p>Your H2O is in a {current.state} state.</p>
      <p>The temperature of your H2O is {current.value}.</p>
      <button
        disabled={!transition.toLiquid}
        onClick={() => transition.toLiquid()}>
        To Liquid
      </button>
      <button
        disabled={!transition.toSolid}
        onClick={() => transition.freeze()}>
        To Solid
      </button>
      <button
        disabled={!transition.toGas}
        onClick={() => transition.boil()}>
        To Gas
      </button>
    </div>
  )
}
// H2O.state.js
import { StateMachine } from 'use-state-machine'
 
export default new StateMachine({
  initial: 'liquid',
  liquid: {
    freeze: 'solid',
    boil: 'gas',
    value: '60F'
  },
  solid: {
    melt: 'liquid',
    value: '32F'
  },
  gas: {
    chill: 'liquid'
    value: '212F'
  }
})

API

useStateMachine

import { useStateMachine } from 'use-state-machine'

useStateMachine(machine: Object | StateMachine) -> [Object, Object]

useStateMachine takes a JavaScript object or StateMachine Object as an argument and returns an array consisting of a current object and a transition object.

current -> Object

The current state consists of two properties: state and value. state returns the string representing the current state. value returns the value (object or primitive) of the current state if one exists and returns undefined if not.

const [ current ] = useStateMachine(H2OState)
 
current.state //-> 'liquid'
current.value //-> '60F'

transition -> Object

transition is an object with a collection of functions allowing the developer to avoid transitioning using the string names. In the example above, when in the liquid state, two passive and two active functions exist on transition. The passive functions are transition.toSolid, transition.toGas. The two active functions are transition.freeze and transition.boil. All state specific functions on transition accept a single value argument.

If the value argument is an Object, the state's value and value argument will be merged. If the the state's value is not an Object, the state's value will be replaced with the value argument. If the state's value is a primitive and the value argument is an object, the state's value will be set to the value argument including a property named value set to the state's previous primitive value.

const [ current, transition ] = useStateMachine(H2OState)
transition.freeze()
 
current.state //-> 'solid'
current.value //-> '32F'
 
transition.melt()
 
current.state //-> 'liquid'
 
transition.toGas()

StateMachine

import { StateMachine } from 'use-state-machine'

new StateMachine(states: Object) -> StateMachine

To create an instance of a StateMachine pass a 'states' object. A valid 'states' object must have, at a minimum, a single state. And an initial property which is set to a valid state property.

There are two types of StateMachine definitions: "active" and passive. If the definition includes names for each valid transition it is an "active" definition and the transition property will include "active" functions (like freeze() and boild()). An example of an "active" definition is:

new StateMachine({
  initial: 'liquid',
  liquid: {
    freeze: 'solid',
    boil: 'gas',
    value: '60F'
  },
  solid: {
    melt: 'liquid',
    value: '32F'
  },
  gas: {
    chill: 'liquid'
    value: '212F'
  }
})

A "passive" definition uses the to property on each state indicating one or more valid states the current state can transition to. For a "passive" definition, the transition property will only include "passive" functions (like toSolid and toGas). An example of an "passive" definition is:

new StateMachine({
  initial: 'liquid',
  liquid: {
    to: ['solid', 'gas']
    value: '60F'
  },
  solid: {
    to: 'liquid'
    value: '32F'
  },
  gas: {
    to: 'liquid'
    value: '212F'
  }
})

<StateMachine>.state -> String

Return the string name of the StateMachine state.

<StateMachine>.value -> Any

value returns the value (object or primitive) of the current state if one exists and returns undefined if not.

<StateMachine>.transition -> Object

transition is an object with a collection of functions allowing the developer to avoid transitioning using the string names. In the example above, when in the liquid state, two passive and two active functions exist on transition. The passive functions are transition.toSolid, transition.toGas. The two active functions are transition.freeze and transition.boil. All state specific functions on transition accept a single value argument.

If the value argument is an Object, the state's value and value argument will be merged. If the the state's value is not an Object, the state's value will be replaced with the value argument. If the state's value is a primitive and the value argument is an object, the state's value will be set to the value argument including a property named value set to the state's previous primitive value.

<StateMachine>.onTransition(callback: Function) -> unsubscribe: Function

When a StateMachine object transitions from one state to another all callbacks passed to the onTransition function are evaluated with the StateMachine object passed as the only argument to the callback. onTransition returns a function that unsubscribes the callback when executed.

Maintainers

  • Mark Stahl

License

MIT

Install

npm i use-state-machine

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0

Version

3.0.5

License

MIT

Unpacked Size

17.5 kB

Total Files

11

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