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    simple-typechecker

    1.0.1 • Public • Published

    simple-typechecker

    Usage

    const check = require('simple-typechecker');
     
    var UserListSchema = {
      "users": [
        {
          "firstName": "string",
          "lastName": "string",
          "age": "number",
          "hobbies": [ "string" ],
          "favoriteColor": [ "string", null ]
        }
      ]
    }
     
    var myUserDataFromServer = {
      users: [
        {
          firstName: "Bob",
          lastName: "Belcher",
          hobbies: [ "cooking burgers", "being a dad", ],
          favoriteColor: "red"
        },
        {
          firstName: "Linda",
          lastName: "Belcher",
          age: 41,
          hobbies: [ "singing", 24, "dancing"]
        },
        {
          firstName: "Tina",
          lastName: "Belcher",
          age: 14,
          hobbies: [ "boys" ]
        }
      ]
    }
     
    check(myUserDataFromServer, UserListSchema, 'TheStuff')

    Output:

    > Assertion failed: TheStuff.users[0].age is not a number: undefined
    > Assertion failed: TheStuff.users[1].hobbies[1] is not a string: 24
    

    What does it do?

    Takes two things as inputs: a JS object containing data, and a JS object (can be fully represented as JSON) representing a schema. It compares the two, and prints informative errors to the console for every discrepancy.

    Who is it for?

    In most projects, the server-side language and/or the DB have strict types already. In those cases, you probably don't need this.

    This utility is for those of us who deal with a loosely-typed server language (in my case, Common Lisp) and a loosely-structured data source (in my case... also Lisp. yeah.) It will spot data problems the moment they hit the browser, and can save hours of debugging.

    How to use it

    Each value in the schema, be it the root value (usually an object, but not necessarily!) or a composite value, takes one of the following forms:

    • A type name which can be gleaned from typeof
    • null, which matches both null and undefined
    • An array with a single value in it, which represents an N-length array of values of that type
    • An array with more than one value in it, which represents a single value of one of those types (for example, [ "string", null ] means "a string or nothing"; [ "string", [], null ] means "a string or an array of any type items or nothing").
    • An object, which represents an object. Its keys specify the schemas for their values, but no complaints will be made about values whose names are not included in the schema. Which means, for example, that { } represents "an object with any or no properties".

    You may have realized at this point that every value in a schema is itself a valid schema, which makes schemas composable. So the example at the top:

    var UserListSchema = {
      "users": [
        {
          "firstName": "string",
          "lastName": "string",
          "age": "number",
          "hobbies": [ "string" ],
          "favoriteColor": [ "string", null ]
        }
      ]
    }

    could have also been:

    var UserSchema = {
      "firstName": "string",
      "lastName": "string",
      "age": "number",
      "hobbies": [ "string" ],
      "favoriteColor": [ "string", null ]
    }
    var UserListSchema = {
      "users": [ UserSchema ] // an array of objects matching UserSchema
    }

    Tips

    • The schemas can be fully represented as JSON, which means they could be stored in their own JSON files or even in a Mongo database or be sent over HTTP.
    • Schemas can be arbitrarily deep and complex. There's no reason that
    "favoriteColor"[ "string", null ]

    couldn't have been

      "favoriteColor"[
        {
          "name": "string",
          "rgb": {
            "r": "number",
            "g": "number",
            "b": "number"
          }
        },
        null
      ]
    • Use these schemas to define a contract between your server- and client-side code, in the absence of a true type system. You can put in writing, "this is what my code works with", and if the server deviates from that, you'll immediately know that that was the reason things broke.

    Install

    npm i simple-typechecker

    DownloadsWeekly Downloads

    2

    Version

    1.0.1

    License

    ISC

    Unpacked Size

    7.31 kB

    Total Files

    4

    Last publish

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