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resolution

1.0.5 • Public • Published

resolution

Build Status

A synchronous Promise-like response object containing a resolved/rejected state and associated value

Install

npm install resolution

or

npm install -g resolution

Then import the module into your program:

var Resolution = require('resolution')

Description

A Resolution Object is a response object to inform the caller whether an execution succeeded or failed.

A Resolution Object can also have a return value associated with it.

States

It can be in one of the following states:

  • pending - This means the Resolution Object has been initialized, but not yet resolved or rejected

  • fulfilled - This means the Resolution Object was successful in its operation, or resolved

  • rejected - This means the Resolution Object was unsuccessful in its operation, or rejected

Properties

The state of any Resolution Object can be determined multiple ways. Each Resolution Object has the following properties:

  • state - String - The name of the current state

  • pending - Boolean - True if this Resolution Object is in the pending state

  • fulfilled - Boolean - True if this Resolution Object is in the fulfilled state

    • resolved will also produce the same result
  • rejected - Boolean - True if this Resolution Object is in the rejected state

  • settled - Boolean - True if the state of this Resolution Object is not pending

  • locked - Boolean - True if the state and value of this Resolution Object cannot be changed

The associated value can be accessed with the following property:

  • value - Any - The value associated with this Resolution Object

Here is a quick example:

var myFile = Resolution(function(){
  return fs.readFileSync( myFile, 'utf8' );
})
/*
If no error:
  myFile.state = 'fulfilled'
  myFile.value = <the file>
If there was an error:
  myFile.state = 'rejected'
  myFile.value = <the Error>
*/

Types

Resolution Objects comes in two types: Immutable and Mutable

Immutable Resolution:

  • Can only be resolved or rejected once
  • Locks immediately after the execution of the provided Function

Mutable Resolution:

  • Can indefinitely have its state and value changed
  • Will only lock when explicitly forced to do so

Comparison to Promises

Along with everything mentioned above, every Resolution Object has the same properties as a Promise does (and more)

Check out the Instance Methods sections of the API for more details

The Resolution Constructor also has the same properties that the Promise Constructor does (and more)

Check out Class Methods section of the API for more details

To see the tests proving that Resolutions and Promises have the same behavior, run the following from within the module directory:

npm run promise-test

or check out tests\promiseTest.js

API

Initialize Immutable Resolutions

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Just like Promises, a Resolution object is created using an executor function:

  • Resolution( executor )

    • executor - Function - Function which will resolve or reject the Resolution. Has the following arguments:

      • resolve - Function - Function to resolve this Resolution with the given value

      • reject - Function - Function to reject this Resolution with the given value

Note :

  • An error will be thrown if executor is not a function

Examples

Can be invoked with or without the new keyword

var res = Resolution(function( resolve, reject ){
  resolve( 100 );
})
//res.state = 'fulfilled'
//res.value = 100
 
var res = new Resolution(function( resolve, reject ){
  reject( 0 );
})
//res.state = 'rejected'
//res.value = 0
 
var res = Resolution(function(){})
//res.state = 'pending'
//res.value = undefined

Only the first invocation of resolve or reject will have any effect

var res = Resolution(function( resolve, reject ){
  resolve( 100 );
  reject( 0 );
})
//res.state = 'fulfilled'
//res.value = 100

Invoking resolve or reject the Resolution asynchronously will not have any effect

var res = Resolution(function( resolve, reject ){
  setTimeout(function(){
    resolve( 100 );
  },1000)
})
 
//Immediately:
//res.state = 'pending'
//res.value = undefined
 
// > 1000 ms later:
//res.state = 'pending'
//res.value = undefined

Unlike Promises, a Resolution can also be resolved but returning any value other than undefined

  • If it was already settled by invoking the resolve or reject arguments, then the return value will be ignored
var res = Resolution(function( resolve, reject ){
  return 100;
})
//res.state = 'fulfilled'
//res.value = 100
 
var res = new Resolution(function( resolve, reject ){
  reject( 0 );
  return 100;
})
//res.state = 'rejected'
//res.value = 0
 
var res = Resolution(function( resolve, reject ){
  return undefined;
})
//res.state = 'pending'
//res.value = undefined

Any errors thrown during the execution of executor will automatically reject the Resolution with the error as the value

  • Unless the Resolution was resolved or rejected before the error was thrown
var res = Resolution(function( resolve, reject ){
  throw new Error()
})
//res.state = 'rejected'
//res.value = Error
 
var res = Resolution(function( resolve, reject ){
  resolve( 100 );
  throw new Error()
})
//res.state = 'fulfilled'
//res.value = 100

A Resolution Object can also be initialized into a specific state:

  • Resolution.resolve( value )

  • Resolution.reject( value )

  • Resolution.pending( value )

    • value - Any - The value associated with this Resolution Object

Examples

var res = Resolution.resolve(100)
//res.state = 'fulfilled'
//res.value = 100
 
var res = Resolution.reject(0)
//res.state = 'rejected'
//res.value = 0
 
var res = Resolution.pending(50)
//res.state = 'pending'
//res.value = 50

Immutable Instance Methods

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As with Promises, a Resolution Object can automatically invoke functions based on the state

  • then( onResolve, onReject )

    • onResolve - Function - Function to run if this Resolution Object is resolved.

    • onReject - Function - Function to run if this Resolution Object is rejected.

For both, the input argument is the value of this Resolution Object

Returns a new Resolution Object resolved to the return value of the callback function.

  • If the callback function was not invoked, then the state and value of the new Resolution Object will match this Resolution Object
  • If the callback function throws an error, then the new Resolution Object will be rejected with that error.

Examples

var res = Resolution(function( resolve, reject ){
  resolve( 100 );
})
.then(function( value ){
  console.log('Resolved to ' + value);
},function( value ){
  console.log('Rejected to ' + value);
});
//Resolved to 100
 
var res = Resolution(function( resolve, reject ){
  reject( 0 );
})
.then(function( value ){
  console.log('Resolved to ' + value);
},function( value ){
  console.log('Rejected to ' + value);
});
//Rejected to 0

Because it returns a new Resolution Object, the then's can be chained

 
var res = Resolution.resolve(100)
.then(function( value ){
  return value-1;
})
.then(function( value ){
  console.log('Resolved to ' + value);
});
//Resolved to 99
 
var res = Resolution.resolve(100)
.then(function(){
  throw new Error()
})
.then(function( value ){
  console.log('Resolved');
},function( value ){
  console.log('Error')
});
//Error

  • catch( onReject )

    • onReject - Function - Function to run if this Resolution Object is rejected.

The input argument is the value of this Resolution Object

Returns a new Resolution Object resolved to the return value of the callback function.

  • If the callback function was not invoked, then the state and value of the new Resolution Object will match this Resolution Object
  • If the callback function throws an error, then the new Resolution Object will be rejected with that error.

Equivalent to calling then( undefined, onReject )

Examples

var res = Resolution.reject(0)
.catch(function( value ){
  console.log('Rejected to ' + value);
});
//Rejected to 0
 
var res = Resolution.reject(0)
.then(function( value ){
  console.log('Resolved to ' + value);
})
.catch(function( value ){
  console.log('Rejected to ' + value);
});
//Rejected to 0
 
var res = Resolution.resolve(100)
.catch(function( value ){
  console.log('Rejected to ' + value);
})
.then(function( value ){
  console.log('Resolved to ' + value);
});
//Resolved to 100
 
var res = Resolution.resolve(100)
.then(function( value ){
  throw new Error();
})
.catch(function( value ){
  console.log('Error');
});
//Error

Initialize Mutable Resolutions

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A Mutable Resolution Object follows the same principals as an Immutable Resolution Object when initializing.

See here for Initializing Immutable Resolutions

  • Resolution.Mutable( executor )

The only difference between a Mutable Resolution and Immutable Resolution Objects during initialization is that the state of a Mutable Resolution Object can be set more than once or asynchronously.

var res = Resolution.Mutable(function( resolve, reject ){
  resolve(100);
  reject(0);
})
//res.state = 'rejected'
//res.value = 0
 
var res = Resolution.Mutable(function( resolve, reject ){
  reject(0);
  return 100;
})
//res.state = 'fulfilled'
//res.value = 100
 
var res = Resolution.Mutable(function( resolve, reject ){
  setTimeout(function(){
    resolve( 100 );
  },1000);
})
 
//Immediately:
//res.state = 'pending'
//res.value = undefined
 
// > 1000 ms later:
//res.state = 'fulfilled'
//res.value = 1000

And as with Immutable Resolution Objects, Mutable Resolution Objects can be initialized in a specific state

  • Resolution.Mutable.resolve( value )

  • Resolution.Mutable.reject( value )

  • Resolution.Mutable.pending( value )

    • value - Any - The value associated with this Resolution Object

Mutable Instance Methods

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A Mutable Resolution Object also contains then and catch (described here)

Note that then and catch are invoked immediately based on the state of the Resolution Object as that instant.

If the state later changes, these will not be retroactively invoked.

To have callbacks be invoked upon a state change, use the on method (see below)

Mutable Resolution Objects contain the following additional methods:

  • resolve( value )

    • To resolve this Resolution with the given value
  • reject( value )

    • To reject this Resolution with the given value
  • reset( value )

    • To reset this Resolution to pending with the given value
  • lock( value )

    • To lock this Resolution in its current state with the given value
    • Use Cautiously - A locked Resolution can not unlocked

If no value is provided, then the current value of this Resolution will not change

var res = Resolution.Mutable.resolve( 100 );
//res.state = 'fulfilled'
//res.value = 100
 
res.reject( 0 );
//res.state = 'rejected'
//res.value = 0
 
res.reset( 50 );
//res.state = 'pending'
//res.value = 50
 
res.resolve();
//res.state = 'fulfilled'
//res.value = 50
//res.locked = false
 
res.lock();
//res.locked = true
 
//cannot be changed once locked
res.reject( 0 );
//res.state = 'fulfilled'
//res.value = 50

Callbacks can also be connected to the state of the Mutable Resolution Object

  • on( which, fn[, once ])

  • which - String - Name of the state change function to connect the callback fn to

    • Either 'resolve', 'reject', or 'reset'
  • fn - Function - The Callback Function to run whenever the desired state change function is called

    • Input argument is the value of this Resolution
  • once - Boolean - Whether the fn should only be called one time

Examples

var res = Resolution.Mutable.pending( 100 );
 
res.on('resolve', function( data ){
  console.log('Always : ' + data)
})
 
res.on('resolve', function( data ){
  console.log('Once : ' + data)
}, true)
 
res.resolve(100);
//Always : 100
//Once : 100
 
res.resolve(50);
//Always : 50

Class Methods

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Just like Promises, the Resolution Class has some methods to handle arrays (or other iterable objects) of Resolution Objects

  • all( iterable )

    • iterable - iterable - Object to iterate through

Returns a new Resolution Object that is:

  • rejected if no iterable object was provided
    • value will be an Error
  • resolved if there are no pending or rejected Resolution Objects in the iterable
    • value will be array of consisting of all values (or Resolution Object values) in the array
  • rejected if there are any rejected Resolution Objects in the iterable
    • value will be the value of the first rejected Resolution in the iterable
  • pending if there are any pending Resolution Objects in the iterable
    • value will be undefined

Examples

var res = Resolution.all()
//res.state = 'rejected'
//res.value = Error
 
var res = Resolution.all([])
//res.state = 'fulfilled'
//res.value = []
 
var res = Resolution.all([Resolution.resolve(100),50])
//res.state = 'fulfilled'
//res.value = [100,50]
 
var res = Resolution.all([Resolution.resolve(100),Resolution.reject(0)])
//res.state = 'rejected'
//res.value = 0
 
var res = Resolution.all([Resolution.resolve(100),Resolution.pending(50)])
//res.state = 'pending'
//res.value = undefined

  • race( iterable )

    • iterable - iterable - Object to iterate through

Returns a new Resolution Object that is:

  • rejected with an Error if no iterable object was provided
  • resolved if the first element in the iterable that is not a pending Resolution Object in the iterable is also not a rejected Resolution Object
    • value is the value of that element
  • rejected if the first element in the iterable that is not a pending Resolution Object in the iterable is a rejected Resolution Object
    • value is the value of that rejected Resolution Object
  • pending with undefined if the iterable is empty or every element in the iterable is a pending Resolution Object

Examples

var res = Resolution.race()
//res.state = 'rejected'
//res.value = Error
 
var res = Resolution.race([])
//res.state = 'pending'
//res.value = undefined
 
var res = Resolution.race([Resolution.pending(50)])
//res.state = 'pending'
//res.value = undefined
 
var res = Resolution.race([Resolution.resolve(100),50])
//res.state = 'fulfilled'
//res.value = 100
 
var res = Resolution.race([50,Resolution.resolve(100)])
//res.state = 'fulfilled'
//res.value = 50
 
var res = Resolution.race([Resolution.resolve(100),Resolution.reject(0)])
//res.state = 'fulfilled'
//res.value = 100
 
var res = Resolution.race([Resolution.reject(0),Resolution.resolve(100)])
//res.state = 'rejected'
//res.value = 0
 
var res = Resolution.race([Resolution.pending(50),Resolution.resolve(100)])
//res.state = 'fulfilled'
//res.value = 100

License

MIT

Install

npm i resolution

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2

Version

1.0.5

License

MIT

Last publish

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