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pg-patch

1.3.4 • Public • Published

pg-patch

Node PostgreSQL patching utility.

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NPM

Features

Preparation

Installing pg-patch

To install pg-patch in your node project just run this command:

npm i pg-patch --save-dev

Patch files

By default all patch files need to:

  • Be inside patch directory: pg-patch (or in any subdirectory)

  • Follow naming convention: patch-$VERSION-$ACTION[-$DESCRIPTION].(sql|js), where:

    • $VERSION - positive non-zero integer (leading zeros accepted)
    • $ACTION - up/rb for update to version and rollback from version respectively
    • $DESCRIPTION - any string matching [0-9a-zA-Z\-\_]+

    Example of valid patch file names:

    • patch_1_up-update-to-version-1.sql
    • patch_1_rb-rollback-from-version-1.js
    • patch_2_up.sql

Above parameters can be configured.

Basic usage

Smallest working example

Easiest way to use pg-patch is:

//use default configuration and patch DB to the newest version possible
require("pg-patch").run();

Above code would use default configuration settings and load DB connection settings from ENV variables.

Alternatively you could create patcher instance and run it separately:

let patcher = require("pg-patch").create();
 
//do something
 
patcher.run();

Both above examples have the same result.

Configuration

Supplying run-time configuration

You can both supply configuration for given run:

require("pg-patch").run(configObject);

As well as setting master configuration for pg-patch instance

let patcher = require("pg-patch").create(configObject);

Master configuration vs run configuration

If you specify both master and run configurations the run configuration properties have priority over master configuration ones:

let patcher = require("pg-patch").create({
    a: 1,
    b: 2
});
 
patcher.run({
    a: 3
});

above code is equal to:

let patcher = require("pg-patch").create();
 
patcher.run({
    a: 3,
    b: 2
});

Using configuration file

If you create .pgpatchrc.json file pg-patch will use it as a source for initial configuration.
This configuration file needs to be in the same firectory from which node command is run.

Example of .pgpatchrc.json:

{
  "logLevel": "LOG",
  "client": "postgres://user:password@host:port/database",
  "dryRun": "LOG_ONLY"
}

Working with async API

Any pg-patch process returns a promise.

require("pg-patch").run(/*
    any config
*/).then(function(){
    //handle success
}, function(err){
    //handle error
});

Connecting to the PostgreSQL

There are currently 3 ways in which pg-patch will try to connect to PostgreSQL.

a) Create pg.Client based on ENV variables (default)

This happens when no client is set in the configuration:

//the same for .run()
require("pg-patch").create({
    //contains no client property
});

b) Create pg.Client based on passed clientConfig

//the same for .run()
require("pg-patch").create({
    client: clientConfig
});

Client configuration object work exactly as in pg package.

let clientConfig = {
    user: 'foo', //env var: PGUSER
    database: 'my_db', //env var: PGDATABASE
    password: 'secret', //env var: PGPASSWORD
    host: 'localhost', // Server hosting the postgres database
    port: 5432, //env var: PGPORT
    max: 10, // max number of clients in the pool
    idleTimeoutMillis: 30000, // how long a client is allowed to remain idle before being closed
};

You can also use connection strings:

let clientConfig = 'postgres://user:password@host:port/database';

For more about pg.Client configuration check pg npm package.

c) Use passed pg.Client instance

let pg = require('pg');
let pgClientInstance = new pg.Client({
    //configuration
});
 
//the same for .run()
require("pg-patch").create({
    client: pgClientInstance
});

IMPORTANT: passed pg.Client instances are not closed automatically by pg-patch.

If You need to close them you can do this using promise handlers.

require("pg-patch").run({
    client: pgClientInstance
}).then(function(){
    pgClientInstance.end();
}, function(err){
    pgClientInstance.end();
});

Step by step migration

To perform migration one step at a time:

let pgPatch = require("pg-patch");
 
pgPatch.stepUp(/* configuration */); //migrate one version up
 
pgPatch.stepDown(/* configuration */); //migrate one version down

Similarly for the command line tool supply stepUp/stepDown flag:

pg-patch --stepUp
pg-patch --stepDown

Other configuration options can be passed as usual, but for obvious reasons targetVersion will be ignored.

Some quick copy'n'run examples

a) Custom patch dir & DB table configuration:

require("pg-patch").run({
    patchDir: 'my-db-patches',
    dbTable: 'public.myPatchControlTable'
});

b) Custom pg.Client config:

require("pg-patch").run({
    client: {
        user: 'me',
        database: 'my_db',
        password: 'pass',
        host: 'localhost',
        port: 5432
    }
});

c) Custom target version:

require("pg-patch").run({
    targetVersion: 10
});

Command line tool

To use pg-patch as a command line tool first install it globally:

npm i pg-patch -g

Afterwards its as easy as running:

pg-patch

Supply configuration by using command line arguments:

pg-patch --logLevel=INFO --client=postgres://user:password@host:port/database

List of possible configuration properties is the same as usual.

For detailed description about passing command line arguments see yargs

Advanced usage

So you want more? Granted!

JS patch data files

  • added in: 1.3.0

Sometimes having possibility to create more dynamic SQL patch data is beneficial and pg-patch allows it in form of js patch files.

JS patch files have the same file name rules as SQL patch files... they just need to end with .js.

They are normal node modules that need to export function which returns SQL string.

 
let sql;
 
/* create sql in any way you need to */
 
module.exports = function(){
    return sql; 
};

For example when you have a lot of repeating data:

 
let dictArray = [ /* a lot of strings */ ];
 
module.exports = function(){
    return dictArray.map(function(v){
        //just an example
        //normally you would want to escape values and make only one insert
        return `insert into dictionary VALUES ('${v}');`;
    }).join(""); 
};

Custom patch data sources

  • added in: 1.2.0
  • Important: Supplying custom patch data does not disable standard file-searching behaviour.
    All found patch data sources will be used when migrating.

If you don't keep your patch data as files or access to these files is not supported by pg-patch (for example FTP) you can supply such data by yourself:

let pgPatch = require("pg-patch");
 
pgPatch.run({
    customPatchData: [
        customPatchDataObj1,
        customPatchDataObj2
        /* ... */
    ]
})

where customPatchDataObjectX needs to conform to given format:

//update 0 => 1
{
    description: 'customDescription',  //not required
    action: 'UPDATE',                  //'UPDATE' or 'ROLLBACK'
    version: '1',                      //version to update TO or rollback FROM
    sql: 'select 1234;'                //any valid SQL (without transaction statements)
}

Custom patch data objects can be supplied in any order.

Transaction control

a) PER_VERSION_STEP (default)

require("pg-patch").run({
    transactionMode: 'PER_VERSION_STEP'
});

In this transaction mode when You want to change DB version by more than one version each update/rollback step will be contained in separate transaction block.

So if you want to move from version X to version X+5 and error happens during X+3:

  • X+4 and X+5 updates won't be even tried
  • X+3 update will be tried and rolled back due to an error
  • whole patch process will end with error (Promise.reject)
  • BUT the resulting DB version will be X+2

b) SINGLE

require("pg-patch").run({
    transactionMode: 'SINGLE'
});

In this transaction mode when You want to change DB version by more than one version all update/rollback steps will be contained in single transaction block.

So if you want to move from version X to version X+5 and error happens during X+3:

  • X+4 and X+5 updates will never be tried
  • X+3, X+2 and X+1 updates will be rolled back
  • whole patch process will end with error (Promise.reject)
  • the resulting DB version will be X

Multiple patch files per update/rollback step

Each patch action step (ex. update action to version X) can be comprised of many patch files. Those files can be in ANY subdirectory of pg-patch.

If given action step has multiple patch files they will be run in order of ascending descriptions.

If two or more patch files for given action step have the same description it is assumed they can be run in any order.

So if update to X action has given patch files:

  • patch-X-up-want-this-first.sql
  • patch-X-up.sql
  • subdir1/patch-X-up-data-part-2.sql
  • subdir2/patch-X-up-data-part-1.sql
  • structure/patch-X-up-0001-structure.sql
  • data/patch-X-up-0002-data.sql

they will be joined in this order:

  • patch-X-up.sql (no descriptions first)
  • structure/patch-X-up-0001-structure.sql (subdirectories are ignored)
  • data/patch-X-up-0002-data.sql
  • subdir2/patch-X-up-data-part-1.sql
  • subdir1/patch-X-up-data-part-2.sql
  • patch-X-up-want-this-first.sql

Dry runs

Dry runs are basically test runs to verify validity of patch files (either manually or directly on DB).
pg-patch supports two types of dry run:

a) LOG_ONLY

require("pg-patch").run({
    dryRun: 'LOG_ONLY'
});

This WILL NOT execute any patch SQL on DB. Maintenance SQL required for pg-patch to work will still be run.
All patch SQL will be instead written to console on INFO level.

b) TEST_SQL

require("pg-patch").run({
    dryRun: 'TEST_SQL'
});

This WILL execute patch SQL on DB using transaction mode SINGLE.
Patch process will fully rollback either on first error or after successful execution of patch SQL.

Configurable log

It is possible to set desired configuration level. (default: 'INFO')

require("pg-patch").run({
    logLevel: 'SUCCESS'  //valid values: 'DEBUG', 'LOG', 'INFO', 'WARN', 'SUCCESS', 'ERROR', 'NONE'
});

...as well as it being colorful: (default: true)

require("pg-patch").run({
    enableColorfulLogs: false
});

Custom patch file template

By default all patch files need to match given regex template: ^patch-$VERSION-$ACTION(?:-$DESCRIPTION)?\\.(?:sql|js)$
Each $VAR has distinct logic usage but for the regex purposes are shortcuts for:

  • $VERSION\\d+
    Version associated with $ACTION.
  • $ACTIONup|rb
    Action to perform. up means "update TO $VERSION" where rb means "rollback FROM $VERSION".
  • $SOURCE\\d+
    Source version. Can only be used with $TARGET.
  • $TARGET\\d+
    Target version. Can only be used together with $SOURCE.
  • $DESCRIPTION[0-9a-zA-Z\-\_]+
    Optional description.

Important: template requires ($VERSION AND $ACTION) OR ($SOURCE AND $TARGET).
Those cannot be combined.

Double backslashes in above replacements are required due to how new Regex() works.
Each of those $VARS are then inserted are regex groups (that is the reason why $ACTION can look like it looks).

So in case of default template ^patch-$VERSION-$ACTION(?:-$DESCRIPTION)?\\.(?:sql|js)$ the final regex is this:
^patch-(?:\d+)-(?:up|rb)(?:-(?:[0-9a-zA-Z-_]+))?\.(?:sql|js)$

Don't worry if You don't fully understand above.
What matters that You can easily change how it works.

Custom patch file template examples

  • Patch files should only contain version and action:

    require("pg-patch").run({
        patchFileTemplate : '^$VERSION-$ACTION\\.sql$'
    });
  • Patch files should REQUIRE a description and start with patch-:

    require("pg-patch").run({
        patchFileTemplate : '^patch-$VERSION-$ACTION-$DESCRIPTION\\.sql$'
    });

Reporters (beta)

  • added in: 1.1.0
  • IMPORTANT: reporters API is not set to stone - be aware it can be changed in future MINOR versions.

pg-patch supports custom reporters. The easiest way to do this is to just supply notify method:

let pgPatcher = require("pg-patch");
 
let patcher = pgPatcher.create({
    notify: [{
        '^PROCESS:.*': function(data, params, combinedParams){
            //do something with 'PROCESS:*' notifications
        },
        '^PATCH.*': function(data, params, combinedParams){
            //do something with 'PATCH*' notifications
        }
    }]
})

above is a shortcut to creating basicReporter:

let pgPatcher = require("pg-patch");
let basicReporter = new pgPatcher.reporters.basic({
    '^PROCESS:.*': function(data, params, combinedParams){
        //do something with 'PROCESS:*' notifications
    },
    '^PATCH.*': function(data, params, combinedParams){
        //do something with 'PATCH*' notifications
    }
});
 
let patcher = pgPatcher.create({
    reporters: [
       basicReporter 
    ]
})

If you would like to check all currently possible messages please check lib/reporters/console-reporter.js file.

Configuration cheatsheet

  • client — Type: Object|String Default: null
    DB connection client / settings. See Connecting to the PostgreSQL.

  • customPatchData — Type: Array Default: null
    Supplies pg-patch with custom patch data. See Custom patch data sources.

  • dbTable — Type: String Default: public.pgpatch
    pg-patch maintenance table to be used. Can also define schema: schema.table. If no schema is passed public is assumed.

  • dryRun — Type: String Default: null
    Run patch in dry run mode? See Dry runs.

  • enableColorfulLogs — Type: Boolean Default: true
    Should colors be used in log?

  • logLevel — Type: String Default: INFO
    Configures how much log information will be shown.

  • patchDir — Type: String Default: pg-patch
    Directory where patch files can be found.

  • patchFileTemplate — Type: String Default: ^patch-$VERSION-$ACTION(?:-$DESCRIPTION)?\\.(?:sql|js)$
    Patch file name template. See Custom patch file template.

  • sourceVersion — Type: Integer Default: null
    Version from which patch DB. When not passed current version is used.
    IMPORTANT: Normally this should not be used as it breaks normal patching route. Use only when really needed.

  • targetVersion — Type: Integer Default: null
    Version to which patch DB. If not passed newest patch file version is used.

  • transactionMode — Type: String Default: PER_VERSION_STEP
    Transaction mode to be used when patching DB. See Transaction control.

Common pitfalls

  1. Make sure DB user you're using has sufficient priviledges to run patch files.
  2. Do NOT include transaction control SQL (BEGIN; COMMIT; ROLLBACK; etc.) into your patch files.
  3. Patch files need to be incremental and in steps of 1 version.
    Specifying jump from version 1 to version 5 in one file will not work.
  4. Initial version number is 0. So first patch file needs to update to version 1.

Testing

To test pg-patch simply run:

gulp test

Licence

ISC License

Copyright (c) 2016, Łukasz Drożdż

Permission to use, copy, modify, and/or distribute this software for any purpose with or without fee is hereby granted, provided that the above copyright notice and this permission notice appear in all copies.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND THE AUTHOR DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES WITH REGARD TO THIS SOFTWARE INCLUDING ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHOR BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, DIRECT, INDIRECT, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER RESULTING FROM LOSS OF USE, DATA OR PROFITS, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS ACTION, ARISING OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE USE OR PERFORMANCE OF THIS SOFTWARE.

Install

npm i pg-patch

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Version

1.3.4

License

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