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illumination

0.0.1 • Public • Published

illumination

A small, composable Philips Hue interface for Node and the browser.

Under development, unstable API.

Why?

Hue's API is rather unintuitive, and has more baggage than probably needed. For example: there are three ways to set a lamp color:

  • XY - Coordinates in CIE color space.
  • Temperature - The degrees in Mired color space.
  • HSB - Hue, saturation, and brightness.

The most intuitive of the three is HSB (aka HSL, which you've probably used in CSS), but the API implements it differently. Brightness goes from 1-254, saturation from 0-254, and hue from 0-65535. That's a far cry from hsl(240, 40%, 45%).

This library handles some of the rougher edges, using TinyColor to collapse any CSS color expression into an API-compliant HSB expression.

light.state.color('blue')
light.state.color('#00F')
light.state.color('rgb(0, 0, 255)')
 
// Supports alpha channels, too
light.state.color('#0000FFFF')

Note: due to hardware limitations, colors may seem a bit off. Try yellow and you'll see what I mean.

Colors are the most obvious, but not the only way Hue's API can be improved...

  • Transition time, measured in second/10 (not milliseconds)
  • Groups (which requires an entirely new API)
  • Scenes (same as groups)

Illumination is created to address these problems, simplifying the hue interface.

It introduces four simpler concepts:

  • States (such as color, alerts/effects, transitions...)
  • Lights (holds state and light information)
  • Presets (Groupings of lights and states)
  • Bridges (for applying presets)

API

Illumination is under development, and APIs are subject to change at little more than a whim. Because of that, I haven't invested much into documenting what they do.

If you want to try it out now, I suggest poking around in the source code - I use JSDoc liberally.

You can install illumination with npm:

$ npm install illumination --save

Then import it (with ES6 modules FTW!)

import * as illumination from 'illumination'

State

State is an interface over hue light state, but it doesn't need to be tied to a light.

import { State } from 'illumination'
const state = new State()

From there, you can start editing the light state. Once you're ready, you add it to a Preset (more on this soon) and submit it to the bridge. If you need to import an existing hue state, you can pass it directly to the constructor.

const state = new State({
    hue: 30000,
    sat: 251,
    bri: 101,
})

Methods

Since the API is changing often, I'm just gonna run through these really quick. Look in the source code for more details.

// Blink the light.
state.blink('once')
state.blink('long')
state.blink('off')
 
// Turn the light on.
state.on(true)
state.on()
 
// Turn the light off.
state.off(true)
state.off()
 
// Start a colorloop.
state.colorloop()
// Stop it.
state.colorloop(false)
 
// Change the color.
state.color('blue')
state.color('#00f')
state.color('rgb(0, 0, 255)')
 
// Degrees, 0-360.
state.hue(240)
// Percent saturation.
state.sat(0.5)
// Percent brightness.
state.bri(0.2)

Light

This class has no methods. It could be implemented as a function, but, you know, symmetry.

You pass Light an object (like one returned from GET /api/lights/1) and it copies the metadata onto itself, but upgrades .state into a State instance.

You'll be able to access the state object from the Light instance like so:

const light = new Light({
    state: { hue: 10000 },
    uniqueid: 'bob',
})
 
light.state.on(true)

Like I said, no methods though. Maybe in the future.

Preset

This is where things get fun! Presets are collections of light states, most comparable to a hue scene (but lightweight).

A preset might be what lights are on at a time, or what colors a group of lights are set to. You can manipulate entire groups at once using some convenience methods.

For example: you might want to create a general preset containing your living room lights, then five more presets that build off it and change the colors and transition times.

// Either add them on at once...
const preset = new Preset({
    1: { name: 'Living Room Lamp' },
    2: { name: 'Office Lamp' },
})
 
// Or add them later.
const light = new Light({
    name: 'Porch Light',
})
preset.add(3, light)

Methods

// Change all colors at once.
preset.color('blue')
 
// Set transition time.
preset.transition(0)
 
// Like Object.keys.
preset.keys()
 
// Adds a new light to the preset.
preset.add(5, new Light)
 
// Iterate over each light.
preset.each((light, id) => {
    console.log(`Light ${id}`, light)
})

Bridge

Creates a bridge interface that understands presets and has a reasonable api.

No bridge discovery mechanism is included, as I think that would be feature bloat and belongs in a separate module.

Also, it would prevent illumination from being browser friendly.

// `ip` is the IP address,
// `key` is the API key.
const bridge = new Bridge(ip, key)

Methods

The Bridge class is fairly new and doesn't have many methods. As needed I'll add some more.

// Formats an absolute url
bridge.url('lights', 5)
// Also works with arrays
bridge.url(['lights', 5])
 
// Resolves to the http response data
bridge.get('lights', 5, 'state')
 
// Sends preset state to the bridge.
// This is probably what you're looking for.
bridge.apply(new Preset)

Installing from GitHub

I love all the cool toys ES6/7 brings. For now, that means compiling the project through Babel.

$ git clone https://github.com/PsychoLlama/iillumination.git
cd illumination
$ npm install
 
# `npm run dev` if you're editing. 
$ npm run babel

To run mocha, do npm test.

Support

If you find a problem, lemme know by filing a GitHub issue. This is a hobby project, but I'll try to follow up asap.

You can support this project and my narcissism by starring it 😀

Install

npm i illumination

DownloadsWeekly Downloads

6

Version

0.0.1

License

MIT

Last publish

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