do-devops
    TypeScript icon, indicating that this package has built-in type declarations

    0.9.0 • Public • Published

    DevOps CLI

    Provides a handy CLI for DevOps functionality on Typescript projects (and particularly those also using the Serverless framework targetting the AWS cloud).

    Install

    You can install do-devops both locally to a repo as well as globally. For a global install:

    npm install global do-devops

    With a global install the dd CLI command should be available to you. Global installs are in general the most convenient way to get started using this CLI.

    Local installs to a repo are recommended if you are using any of the CLI commands as part of your repo's devops. This then allows these commands to be wrapped as scripts in your package.json file and ensures that everyone interacting with the repo is using do-devops and using a consistent version of it.

    # using npm
    npm install --save-dev do-devops
    # using yarn
    yarn add --dev do-devops

    Commands

    To get an up-to-date list of commands from do-devops just run dd by itself from the terminal and it will list out all commands. Furthermore, if you want more detail on a command you can just type dd [command] --help.

    That said we wanted to give you some idea of what you're getting here. It's not like we're running for political office and want to abstract everything to the point of saying nothing. :)

    Think of the commands you get as fitting into two camps ... well maybe three. We'll discuss the camps in the following two sections.

    The Serverless Crowd

    The first camp (which you could argue is two camps) are those commands whose primary function is to aid and abet people who use the Serverless Framework and so their primary utility is only activated when you're inside a repo that's using the framework. The two primary examples of this are listed below:

    • deploy - the Serverless framework is largely a deployment framework but open a really powerful set of tooling that allows for strongly typed configuration, inline configuration, and much more. A full description of this is actually descibed on the aws-orchestrate website. This is a sister repo for this command and if you're using this then you'd probably be interested in both (though you don't need it). Basically the short version is we'll make your serverless life a lot easier and more powerful while maintaining at the core the same Serverless framework that you know and love.
    • build - the idea of building in a repo that uses the Serverless framework may not immediately connect because there is no serverless "build" command but rather what this represents is a pre-step that we take in every deployment where we both transpile your Typescript to Javascript and bundle/tree-shake it with an opinionated Rollup configuration (you can opt out if you like). This gives you more compact handler functions as well enabling the type support and power configurations aluded to above. To really understand this you'll want to read the docs at aws-orchestrate.

    Now for folks who type dd deploy or dd build in a repo which is not got the serverless framework installed, you'll instead get a thin wrapper around your package manager of choice (aka., yarn, npm, and pnpm). Mainly we're just trying to get out of your way here but it does have utility for folks who are constantly switching between repos which use differnt package managers and accidentally typing yarn build instead of npm run build, etc.

    In situations such as this, the CLI will detect which package manager is being used in the the wrapper and then run the appropriate script in package.json for you. You can completely ignore this functionality if you like but sometimes this abstraction is nice too. For those who like this we also have a few hidden commands that perform this abstraction for you:

    • tt install - runs yarn, npm install, or pnpm install based on the repo
    • tt outdated - runs yarn outdated, npm outdated, or pnpm outdated based on the repo
    • tt update - runs yarn update, npm update, or pnpm update based on the repo

    By "hidden" we mean that these commands will not be listed when you enter just dd to the console. You can force their visibility with dd --showHidden.

    The Rest of Us

    Ok the remaining commands are a little less attached to the idea of AWS and Serverless but some are still connected. Here are a few examples:

    1. autoindex

      it is quite common to spread a related set of functionality across files in a sub-directory and then to add a index.ts file which makes each of these files available in a more convenient fashion. The problem is that everytime you add, remove, or rename a file you also need to update the index.ts file. With this feature this can be done for you. You simply state your interest in the file to be autoindexed by dropping in // #autoindex into the file and then run tt autoindex in the repo and it'll autoindex all which have this hint.

    2. latest

      Do you find yourself wonder what the latest tagged version is in your repo? Just type tt latest to find out. You can also type tt latest [pkg] and it will tell you about another npm packages latest release.

    3. info

      Provides interesting information about the repo you are in. This info is contextual and will add in serverless info if your repo is using serverless, it also knows about certain frameworks (like VueJS, React, Lerna, RushJS, etc.). Primarily just meant as a way to give you a summary overview of the repo's characteristics.

    4. ssm

      AWS provides a handy way for you to manage your secrets. Well actually they provide two. Most people will be aware of secrets manager but there is also SSM and SSM is much more cost effective and will meet the needs for a majority of your use cases (secrets manager is more power for those that need it's features). Of course the AWS CLI does provide utility to manage SSM from the command line but it's awkward. From this CLI you can a compact list, get, and set surface area that we find much nicer. Let's face it, we all have a lot of secrets ... why not make managing them lower friction.

    5. endpoints

      If you're in a serverless repo it will bring up a nice tabular view of all the serverless functions which are exposed by the repo. If you're not in a serverless repo it will switch to interactive mode and ask you which AWS profile in your crentials file to use to report on the same information (it'll ask you which region too if that's not stated in the profile).

    There are plenty more functions but this should give you a flavor and hopefully let you decide if you're interested.

    Contribution

    We welcome contributions as PR's but we ask that you respect the eslint rules that are defined in this repo from a code style standpoint and that you target the develop branch for your PR.

    License

    Copyright (c) 2019 Inocan Group

    Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

    The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

    THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.

    Install

    npm i do-devops

    DownloadsWeekly Downloads

    58

    Version

    0.9.0

    License

    MIT

    Unpacked Size

    1.66 MB

    Total Files

    1027

    Last publish

    Collaborators

    • ksnyde