Miss any of our Open RFC calls?Watch the recordings here! »

dfa-machine

1.0.2 • Public • Published

dfa-machine

A simple implementation of a dynamic finite state machine represinting an instance of a DFA (deterministic finite automata)

Installation

Install dfa-machine using npm with the command $ npm install dfa-machine --save

Abstract

Any deterministic finite automata is defined by five tuples (Q,Σ,q0,δ,F) where:

  • Q: The set of all states
  • Σ (sigma): The set of all accepted inputs
  • q0: The initial or starting state
  • δ (delta): The transition function δ: Q X Σ ⟶ Q
  • F: The set of final/accepted states

Illustration

dfa-machine uses the same concept and implements it in javascript as follows: The constructor of the DFA accpets two arguments:

  1. sigma: an array of all accepted inputs The current version supports inputs of the types String, Number, and Boolean only
  2. machine object: an object describing initial state, final state(s), all states, and the trnsition functions/course for each state.
    • The key initial must be present and have the value of a string represinting the name/key of the initial state which will be provided in the states object.
    • The key final must be present and have the value of an array describing the states which will be considered accepted as a final states for a given string to be validated.
    • The key states must be present and have the value of an object describing each state as a key (including but not limited to the initial and final states).
      • states key must have the value of an object such as {on: {input1: 'next-state', input2: 'next-state', ...etc}} which will describe the transition function for each state while reading all inputs to be applied.

Usage

const DFA = require('dfa-machine');

In this example we will create a dfa on Σ = {0,1} that accepts strings of length greater than 0 with an even number of 1s which described in the below figure.

dfa-example

Our states:

  • q0: The initial state. It represents either an empty string or a string with no 1s in it (non-final).
  • q1: Represents an odd number of 1s (non-final).
  • q2: Represents an even number of 1s (final).

With that in mind we will setup our DFA instance as follows:

const sigma = [0, 1];
 
const machineObj = {
  initial: 'q0', // `q0` is the key-name of the initial state provided in `states` object
  final: ['q2'], // `['q2']` is the key-name(s) of the states for the machine to consider final/acceptable to end with (which must be present in `states` key below).
  states: {
    q0: { on: { 0: 'q0', 1: 'q1' } }, // the `on` object will describe the course for the transition function to follow as when recieving input 0 while the state is q0 the next state will be q0
    q1: { on: { 0: 'q1', 1: 'q2' } },
    q2: { on: { 0: 'q2', 1: 'q1' } },
  },
};
 
const dfa = new DFA(sigma, machineObj);
 
dfa.validate('1101101001').status; // Valid
 
// OR
 
dfa.validate('1101101001');
dfa.status; // Valid

Examples

See more examples here: https://github.com/ahmedisam99/dfa-machine/tree/master/examples

License

MIT

Install

npm i dfa-machine

DownloadsWeekly Downloads

5

Version

1.0.2

License

MIT

Unpacked Size

25.8 kB

Total Files

12

Last publish

Collaborators

  • avatar