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    boostarray

    0.0.3 • Public • Published

    BoostArray

    Booster shot for JavaScript Arrays

    Adds "boosted" iterator methods to ordinary JavaScript arrays.

    Note: BoostArray is experimental. Feedback is appreciated. Please see techfort/PowerArray for an alternative approach.

    Introduction

    The fastest way to iterate over an array in JavaScript is always going to be writing out the explicit for or while loop like this[citation needed]:

    for (var i = 0, len = myArray.length; i < len; i++) {
        myFunc(myArray[i]);
    }
    

    However, nothing beats the convenience of JavaScript's forEach and sibling functions (map, reduce, filter):

    myArray.forEach(myFunc);
    

    However convenience comes at a cost. forEach, and siblings, do various type checking and have various extra features not needed 93%[based on very unscientific analysis of my own code] of the time. These features, desired in many cases, slow the looping process down significantly (see benchmarks below).

    BoostArray is like a Booster shot for JavaScript Arrays in that it adds additional fast versions of forEach and siblings to a ordinary JavaScript arrays or, optionally, all native arrays (see usage below). Switching between the standard method and the similar boosted method can be as simple as adding a single character:

    myArray.$forEach(myFunc);
    

    Usage

    There are three ways to use BoostArray:

    As a boost for ordinary JavaScript arrays (recommended method)

    var boostedArray = BoostArray();
    
    /* ...add some elements using push(), etc */
    
    boostedArray.$forEach(myFunc);
    

    boostedArray is initially an empty array that has the boosted methods attached (see methods below). Note that while BoostArray looks (and sort of acts) like a constructor it... it really isn't (see here). BoostArray adds methods to existing arrays, but in the example above, since no array is passed to the "constructor" so BoostArray assumes you want a new array. The following method for boosting an existing array is recommended:

    BoostArray(myArray);
    myArray.$forEach(myFunc);
    

    Note: using this method, any array returned from Array.prototype or BoostArray.prototype methods will be an ordinary JavaScript array. You will need subsequently to boost any array's returned from these methods (if you want to later use the boosted methods).

    BoostArray(myArray);
    var resultArray = BoostArray(myArray.$map(myFunc));
    

    As a boost for all arrays (use with caution)

    BoostArray(Array.prototype);
    
    /* ... */
    
    myArray.$forEach(myFunc);
    

    This will boost all JavaScript arrays. All JavaScript arrays will now have the fast "boosted" methods.

    Note: In general extending JavaScript natives is not recommended (see Extending JavaScript Natives) and may break other libraries. Use with caution.

    As a boosting toolset

    BoostArray.prototype.$forEach.call(myArray, myFunc);
    

    Using JavaScript's Function.prototype.call() method the BoostArray methods can be applied to any array or array like object.

    Methods

    A boosted array (by any of first two methods above) is still an ordinary JavaScript Array. Therefore it contains all the standard Array.prototype methods.

    BoostArray.isBoostedArray(element)

    Returns true if an element is a boosted array, if not false.

    Accessor methods

    In addition to Array.prototype accessor methods a boosted array contains the following additional fast methods.

    Notice the dollar sign for boosted methods.

    BoostArray.prototype.$indexOf(searchElement)

    Returns the first index of an element within the array that is strictly equal (the same method used by the === operator) to the searchElement, or -1 if none is found.

    Note: Unlike Array.prototype.indexOf there is no fromIndex used start the search at, there is no handling of sparse arrays.

    Iteration methods

    In addition to Array.prototype iteration methods a boosted array contains the following additional fast methods.

    Notice the dollar sign for boosted methods.

    BoostArray.prototype.$forEach(callback)

    Calls the callback function for each element in the array in ascending order.

    Note: Unlike Array.prototype.forEach there is no thisArg used for callback binding, there is no handling of sparse arrays, and the callback function is invoked with only the element value (i.e. no element index or reference to the original array).

    BoostArray.prototype.$filter(callback)

    Creates a new ordinary array with all of the elements of this array for which the provided filtering function returns true.

    Note: Unlike Array.prototype.filter there is no thisArg used for callback binding, there is no handling of sparse arrays, and the callback function is invoked with only the element value (i.e. no element index or reference to the original array). Also note that unless you have boosted the Array.prototype as discussed above the returned value will not have the boosted methods attached.

    BoostArray.prototype.$map(callback)

    Creates a new ordinary array with the results of calling a provided function on every element in this array.

    Note: Unlike Array.prototype.map there is no thisArg used for callback binding, there is no handling of sparse arrays, and the callback function is invoked with only the element value (i.e. no element index or reference to the original array). Also note that unless you have boosted the Array.prototype as discussed above the returned value will not have the boosted methods attached.

    BoostArray.prototype.$reduce(callback, initialValue)

    Apply a the callback function against each value of the array (in ascending order) reducing it to a single value.

    Note: Unlike Array.prototype.reduce the initialValue is not optional, there is no handling of sparse arrays, and the callback function is invoked with only the element value (i.e. no element index or reference to the original array).

    Benchmarks

    For benchmarks see Hypercubed/ArraySpeedTests

    Contributions

    Pull requests are appreciated. However, remember keep it fast by:

    1. no callback binding,
    2. no type checking,
    3. no element index or reference to the original array.

    Acknowledgements

    BoostArray was inspired by PowerArray by Joe Minichino, fast.js, ramda, and lodash. Much of the Array sub-classing code based on Extending JavaScript Arrays While Keeping Native Bracket-Notation Functionality by Ben Nadel.

    License

    2014 Jayson Harshbarger

    MIT License

    Install

    npm i boostarray

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    Version

    0.0.3

    License

    MIT

    Last publish

    Collaborators

    • hypercubed