@logdna/setup-chain

    1.0.10 • Public • Published

    LogDNA's Test Setup Chain

    semantic-release All Contributors

    This is a base class for implementing seed and resource data for test suites. Integration tests that rely on other data to exist prior to testing new features can use this package to easily generate such things. For example, to test a new User property, one must first create an Organization, then add a User to belong to that Organization. Using this package simplifies the code needed to do those kinds of repetitive tasks in the test suite.

    $ npm install @logdna/setup-chain [--save-dev]

    Program Flow

    The SetupChain can be given action functions which will ultimately be executed by async/await in the order they are given. Action functions are through builder functions (usually with the same name), placing a task onto a queue in the order specified, but they are not run until .execute() is called. This requires a handler function added to the SetupChain for each action to expose it. This can be done automatically (see below), or defined in the sub-class by the developer.

    State

    The result returned from each action on the chain is stored in the state object. The label parameter of task signature will be used as the property for the return value in state. If omitted, the action name will be used instead (and if there are duplicate actions, the last one wins).

    const state = await chain
      .foo('first') // Assumes `foo` and `bar` are an echo functions that returns the input
      .foo('winner')
      .foo('third', 'foo_two')
      .bar({baz: 'foobarbaz'}, 'bar_label')
      .bar('baz')
      .execute()
    
    > {foo: 'winner', foo_two: 'third', bar_label: {baz: 'foobarbaz'}, bar: 'baz'}

    Auto-Exposing Action Handlers

    The SetupChain can automatically create SetupChain.prototype[action] as a builder function to create the task on the queue. To take advantage of this, the developer's action function must use a signature of async function(opts), and pass all options in that single object parameter. If using this style, all action function definitions can be passed to the SetupChain upon instantiation, and it will create these builder functions automatically.

    Custom Action Signatures

    Occasionally, a developer may want a different action signature to provide a better style. For example, the built-in action for repeat uses .repeat(times, action, action_options, label) for its signature. To do this, the developer must expose the action handler themselves within their sub-class, and as long as the task is created with the expected format, that's all that will be needed. Remember to always return this at the end of any custom action handler to maintain chainability.

    Required Task Format

    When tasks go onto the queue, they must have the format of [key, label, ...rest]. So, if a custom action signature is being used for an action named myAction, then the action handler can accept parameters in whatever format, as long as they get pushed onto the task queue with the format that execute expects.

    myCustomAction(firstParam, secondParam, label) {
      this.tasks.push(['myCustomAction', label, firstParam, secondParam])
      return this
    }

    API

    new SetupChain(state, actions)

    Instantiates a new chain instance. If passed an object, it will be used as the initial internal state. This is stored in chain.state, and is an object that holds the results of all the action calls. As the second parameter, the object of action functions can be passed.

    Parameters

    • state Object (optional): If passed, initializes the new chain with this state
    • actions Object (optional): An object containing action names and their functions
    const SetupChain = require('@logdna/setup-chain')
    const my_actions = require('./my-action-functions.js')
    
    const first_chain = new SetupChain(null, my_actions)
    const first_state = await first_chain
      .func1()
      .func2()
      .execute()
    
    > {func1: '...', func2: '...'}
    
    // Initialize with a pre-existing state object  
    const second_chain = new SetupChain({
      b: {
        c: 2
      , d: {
          e: 3
        }
      }
    })
    
    const second_state = await second_chain.execute()
    
    > {b: {c: 2, d: {e: 3}}}

    set(label, value)

    Manually sets a value that will be saved in the final output and persisted across executions. This is a chain action resolved by execute.

    Parameters

    • label String|Object: The name of the key to set in the final output. If this value is an Object, then each of its values will be passed through this.lookup for rendering.
    • value Any(optional): Value to be stored at label in setupChain.state. This can also be a string in lookup form, beginning with a # or !. These will be passed through this.lookup and stored at label in setupChain.state.

    Returns: this<SetupChain>

    const chain = new SetupChain()
    
    chain.set('foo', 1)
    await chain.execute()
    
    > {foo: 1}
    const chain = new SetupChain()
    
    chain.set({
      foo: 1
    , 'a.b': '#foo'
    , bar: '!random'
    , combine: '!template:"foo-{{#foo}}, ab-{{#a.b}}"'
    })
    await chain.execute()
    
    > {foo: 1, bar: 'af4b31', a: {b: 1}, combine: 'foo-1, ab-1'}

    map(collection, iterator, label)

    Takes a collection (array, or #lookup value), and applies an iterator function to each item. The return value from the iterator will be the final result. Results are returned in an array, and placed into the chain state at label. This is a chain action resolved by execute.

    Parameters

    • collection Array|String: An array/collection of data to apply the map function to. A string can be given in order to use lookup, e.g. '#myUsers'
    • iterator Function: This is the iterator function that will receive each collection item. It can be an async or regular function that accepts item. Currently this does not support callbacks
    • label String: Optional label in which to store the result.

    Returns: this<SetupChain>

    const chain = new SetupChain()
    const state = await chain
      .set('my_array', [1, 2, 3])
      .map('#my_array', async function addOneSecond(num) {
        const result = await addOne(num)
        return result
      }, 'one_sec_Func')
      .execute()
    
    > {one_sec_Func: [2, 3, 4]}

    sort(collection, comparator, label)

    Takes a collection (array, or #lookup) and applies a sort function to each item. Although this uses Javascript's sort function under the hood (which mutates), calling setupChain.sort will NOT mutate the input. This is done for consistency since the lookup result will sometimes provide a new array, and sometimes not. This is a chain action resolved by execute.

    Parameters

    • collection Array|String: An array/collection of data to apply the sort function to. A string can be given in order to use lookup, e.g. '#myCollection'
    • comparator Function: This is the the comparator function ultimately used by Javascript's Array.prototype.sort function. The input array will not be mutated.
    • label String: Optional label in which to store the result.

    Returns: this<SetupChain>

    function comparator(a, b) {
      if (a < b) return -1
      if (a > b) return 1
      return 0
    }
    const chain = new SetupChain()
    const state = await chain
      .set('cols', ['biz', 'zarf', 'biz', 'clunk', 'goof', 'app'])
      .sort(cols, comparator, 'cols_sorted')
      .execute()
    
    > {cols_sorted: ['app', 'biz', 'biz', 'clunk', 'goof', 'zarf']}

    repeat(times, name, opts, label)

    Executes each task added sequentially and collects the results into a single object. This is a chain action resolved by execute.

    Parameters

    • times Number: The number of times to repeat the given action name
    • name String: The name of the action to execute. This must already exist on the chain as a valid action.
    • opts Object: Any options that the named action requires. Currently, this only supports actions with an (opts) signature. Custom signatures are not yet supported.
    • label String: Optional label in which to store the result.

    Returns: this<SetupChain>

    const SetupChain = require('@logdna/setup-chain')
    
    class MyChain extends SetupChain {
      constructor(state) {
        super(state, {
          hello: async () => {
            return 'hi'
          }
        })
      }
    }
    
    const chain = new MyChain()
    chain
      .repeat(5, 'hello', {}, 'result')
      .execute()
      .then((result) => {
        console.log(result)
      })
    
    > {result: ['hi', 'hi', 'hi', 'hi', 'hi']}

    sleep(opts)

    When used in a chain, it will wait for a specified number of milliseconds before returning. Since this is a chain action, the sleep will appear to happen sequentially within the action chain.

    Parameters

    • opts Object: configuration options
      • ms Number: The number of milliseconds to wait before continuing

    Returns: this<SetupChain>

    reset()

    Manually clears internal state and any pending tasks

    Returns: this<SetupChain>

    execute()

    Resolves the promises returned by chain actions, and returns the result of each action in a single object. This should be the final method in any chain, otherwise the actions will not be resolved into values. After execute is called, the return value is also stored in chain.state for access later, even if the return value is not immediately used.

    Returns: Object

    lookup(input)

    This function is generally used by actions to resolve values from the chain as it is executes, thus this function is not chainable. For a chainable action that persists a value to the chain state, use set() instead.

    Parameters

    • input String|Object|Array: The string path or object to look up

      • If the input is a string, and starts with a # symbol it is considered to be a lookup path and will return the requested value from internal state if found.
        • Array lookups should use the index value in dot notation, e.g. #biz.1
      • If the input is a string, and starts with a ! symbol it is considered a function call and will call any registered actions from the chain instance and store the result in internal state.
      • If the input is an object, each key in the object will be resolved following the above rules.
      • If the input is an array, each item in the array will be resolved following the above rules.

    Returns: String|Object|Array

    const chain = new SetupChain()
    const state = chain
      .set('one', 1)
      .set('two', 2)
      .set('three.one', 1)
      .set('four', ['a', 'b', 'c', {d: 'bleck'}])
      .set('five', '#four.2') // Indirectly use `lookup` within a chain
      .execute()
    
    chain.lookup('#one') // 1
    chain.lookup('#three') // {one: 1}
    chain.lookup('#three.one') // 1
    chain.lookup('#four.2') // 'c'
    chain.lookup('#four.3.d') // 'bleck'
    chain.lookup('!template:"{{#one}}{{#two}}{{#three.one}}"{{#four.0}}"') // '121a'
    
    state.five // 'c'

    Usage

    In your test suites you can instantiate a chain instance to perform a series of async tasks while storing the result in a single object. Actions can do anything from returning random data, inserting records into a data store, to sending log entries to a remote parser. Existing code from your project can be trivially wired up as actions on the chain. For example, if you had a organization-create.js and a user-create.js, they could be called like so:

    const state = await new MyChain()
      .createOrganization()
      .set('user_id', '!random:5')
      .createUser({id: '#user_id'})
      .execute()
    
    console.log(state)
    
    > {createOrganization: 'My Test Org!', createUser: '04335c3fcb'}

    Creating a chain

    The base class is intended to give a starting point for creating targeted setup chains for tests in your specific projects. The only requirement is setting local actions property in the constructor which is an Object holding name / asnyc function parings

    The base class provides a set default actions which you can choose to include. Each action will be exposed via a builder function that queues a task.

    const SetupChain = require('@logdna/setup-chain')
    
    const actions = require('../actions')
    class MyChain extends SetupChain {
      constructor(state) {
        super(state, actions)
      }
    }

    Actions

    An action is simply an async function that performs some action and optionally returns some value. Every action function is called in the context of the SetupChain instance.

    Adding a New Action

    const actions = {
      name: async (opts) => {
        return opts.name || randomName()
      }
    
      greet: async (opts) => {
        const defaults = {
          greeting: 'hello'
        , names: []
        }
    
        const config = this.lookup({
          ...defaults
        , ...opts
        })
    
        return config.names.map((name) => {
          return `${config.greeting} ${name}`
        })
      }
    }
    
    class MyChain extends SetupChain {
      constructor(state) {
        super(state, actions)
      }
    }

    The result of previous function calls in the chain can be passed as arguments into another. The values of previous results can be accessed using the # symbol followed by the name of the key. Simple Object path notation is supported

    const state = await new MyChain()
      .name({name: 'greg'}, 'name_1')
      .name({name: 'fred'}, 'name_2')
      .greet({
        greeting: 'Goodbye'
      , names: ['#name_1', '#name_2']
      }, 'greeting_1')
      .execute()
    
    console.log(state)
    
    {
      name_1: 'greg'
      name_2: 'fred'
    , greeting_1: ['Goodbye greg', 'Goodbye fred']
    }

    Helper Functions via lookup

    The lookup function has the ability to execute functions when simple object path lookups aren't sufficient. The syntax for function execution is as follows. Simple arguments can be passed. If arguments are passed, numeric and boolean values will be casted to the appropriate type. Everything else will be handled as a string. String arguments must be quoted with either single or double quotes if the string contains a comma. Functions may also be used as arguments, but must use the more conventional call () syntax to ensure arguments are passed appropriately.

    !<name>:arg,arg,arg
    !<name>:"one,two",three
    !<name>("one,two", !random:1, !foo("bar", "baz"), #nested.key)
    

    Included Helper Functions

    There is a few helper functions that we felt were valuable enough to include in the base class.

    random(bytes)

    Generates a random HEX string. It accepts an optional single argument that specifies the number of random bytes to generate. This can be used when generating unique ids or names to be used in database records, for example. Combined with !template, this is a useful helper function.

    Parameters

    • bytes Number: The number of bytes in the result

    Returns: String

    chain.lookup('!random:2') // 3830
    chain.lookup('!random:10') // eddbdf576eac2ded313d

    template(input)

    Returns a string with replacement patterns from the chain. Templates are rendered in the same sequence as other operations on the chain. Only the data from actions prior to the template function will be available for replacement. template supports a basic bracket syntax for replacements where everything in between double curly bracews ({{ }}) is evaluated. This means that both # and ! syntax is supported for deep lookup calls.

    Parameters

    • input String: The string template to parse

    Returns: String

    await chain.set('name', 'World').execute()
    await chain.set('foo', {bar: "baz"}).execute()
    
    chain.lookup('!template:"Hello {{#name}}"') // Hello World
    chain.lookup('!template:"Hello {{#name}} - {{#foo.bar}}"') // Hello World - baz
    chain.lookup('!template:"Hello, my name is {{#name}}"') // Hello, my name is World

    Exposing a New Helper Function

    Any instance method that is prefixed with $ is available as an executable function through lookup by using a ! in from of the lookup string. In these cases, the string will be the parameters needed for the function.

    class MyChain extends SetupChain {
      constructor(state) {
        super(state)
      }
    
      $max(...args) {
        return Math.max(...this.lookup(args))
      }
    }
    new MyChain({three: 3, val: 100})
      .lookup('!max: 1,2,#three,#val') // 100

    LAST

    Lookup Abstract Syntax Tree

    last is a specification for representing the lookup input format as an abstract syntax tree. It implements the unist spec. This is the parser/lexer used when inspecting inputs for the lookup command. This section is for documentation purposes only, and most likely will not be needed by users of this package.

    last

    syntax diagram

    Interfaces

    Node

    Represents the base stucture of all AST nodes

    interface Node {
      type: string
      position: Position?
    }

    Point

    Represents one place in a source file.

    • column: (1-indexed integer) represents a column in the source input
    • offset: (0-indexed integer) represents a character in the source input
    • line: (1-indexed integer) represents the line in the source input
    interface Point {
      line: number >= 1
      column: number >= 1
      offset: number >= 0?
    }

    Position

    Position represents the location of a node in a source file.

    • start: Represents the place of the first character of the parsed source region
    • end: Represents the place of the first character after the parsed source region
    interface Position {
     start: Point
     end: Point
    }

    Nodes

    Root

    The entry point of a last(unist) syntax tree. It has no parents

    Function

    Represents a function call where children represent the positional arguments

    interface Function <: Node {
      value: string
      children: [Node]
    }
    !foo:1
    

    Yields:

    {
      type: 'root'
    , children: [{
        type: 'function'
      , value: 'foo'
      , children: [
          {type: 'literal', value: 1}
        ]
      }]
    }
    !foo(1, bar(2))
    

    Yields:

    {
      type: 'root'
    , children: [{
        type: 'function'
      , value: 'foo'
      , children: [
          {type: 'literal', value: 1}
        , {
            type: 'function'
          , value: 'bar'
          , children: [
              {type: 'literal', value: 2}
            ]
          }
        ]
      }]
    }

    Lookup

    interface Function <: Node {
      value: string
    }
     #foo.bar
    

    Yields:

    {
      type: 'root'
    , children: [{
        type: 'lookup'
      , value: 'foo.bar'
      }]
    }

    Contributors

    Thanks goes to these wonderful people (emoji key):


    Darin Spivey

    💻 📖 🚧 ⚠️ 👀

    Eric Satterwhite

    💻 📖 🚧 ⚠️ 👀

    Mike Del Tito

    💻 📖 🚧 ⚠️ 👀

    Evan Lucas

    💻 📖 🚧 ⚠️ 👀

    This project follows the all-contributors specification. Contributions of any kind welcome!

    Install

    npm i @logdna/setup-chain

    DownloadsWeekly Downloads

    256

    Version

    1.0.10

    License

    SEE LICENSE IN LICENSE

    Unpacked Size

    54.3 kB

    Total Files

    18

    Last publish

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